France to pull troops out of Niger following coup

Must read

Africa’s largest economy is battling a currency crisis and soaring inflation

IBADAN, Nigeria - Feb. 19, 2024: Demonstrators are seen at a protest against the hike in price and hard living conditions in Ibadan on...

Turkey is back in from the cold with NATO and F-16 moves, but thorny issues remain

President of Turkey Recep Erdogan addresses journalists during the final national press conference during the high level NATO summit in Litexpo Conference Centre in...

Shares of supplier TSMC, chip equipment maker ASML fall ahead of Nvidia’s earnings report

A laptop keyboard, a binary code reflected and Nvidia logo displayed on a phone screen are seen in this illustration photo taken in Krakow,...

Skull and Bones, Singapore’s first major video game title, launches to mixed reviews

Justin Farren, Creative Director at Ubisoft Singapore, reveals "Skull & Bones" during the Ubisoft E3 conference at the Orpheum Theater on June 11, 2018...

France to pull troops out of Niger following coup © Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A person holds a paper that reads ‘We no longer want France’ as Nigerien women demonstrate by hitting and carrying kitchen utensils in support of the putschists in front of French Army headquarters, in Niamey, Niger August 30, 2023. REUTERS/Ma

By Sybille de La Hamaide and Richard Lough

PARIS (Reuters) – France will pull its soldiers out of Niger following a July coup in the West African country, President Emmanuel Macron said on Sunday, dealing a huge blow to French influence and counter-insurgency operations in the Sahel region.

Macron said 1,500 troops would withdraw by the end of the year and that France, the former colonial power in Niger, refused to “be held hostage by the putchists”.

France’s exit, which comes after weeks of pressure from the junta and popular demonstrations, is likely to exacerbate Western concerns over Russia’s expanding influence in Africa. The Russian mercenary force Wagner already present in Niger’s neighbour Mali.

The French president has refused to recognise the junta as Niger’s legitimate authority but said Paris would coordinate troop withdraw with the coup leaders.

“We will consult with the putschists because we want things to be orderly,” Macron said in an interview with France’s TF1 and France 2 television stations.

France’s ambassador was also being pulled out and would return to the country in the next few hours, Macron added.

French influence over its former colonies has waned in West Africa in recent years, just as popular vitriol has grown. Its forces have been kicked out of neighbouring Mali and Burkina Faso since coups in those countries, reducing its role in a region-wide fight against deadly Islamist insurgencies.

Until the coup, Niger had remained a key security partner of France and the United States, which have used it as a base to fight an Islamist insurgency in West and Central Africa’s wider Sahel region.

RUSSIA’S EXPANDING PRESENCE

France’s military base in Niger’s capital, Niamey, had become the epicentre of anti-French protests since the July 26 coup.

Groups have regularly gathered on the street outside to call for the exit of troops stationed in the capital. On one Saturday this month, tens of thousands rallied against France, slitting the throat of a goat dressed in French colours and carrying coffins draped in French flags.

Pro-coup demonstrators in Niamey have waved Russian flags, adding to Western countries’ fears that Niger could follow Mali’s lead and replace their troops with Wagner fighters.

Before his death in a plane crash last month, Russian mercenary chief Yevgeny Prigozhin spoke in a social media clip of making Russia greater on all continents and Africa more free. Wagner’s future has been unclear since his demise.

Wagner is also active in Central African Republic and Libya. Western nations say it is also present in Sudan, though it denies this. Russian President Vladimir Putin has called for a return to constitutional order in Niger.

French nuclear power plants source a small amount – less than 10% – of their uranium from Niger, with France’s state-owned Orano operating a mine in Niger’s north.

Macron said he still regarded democratically elected President Mohammed Bazoum, currently held prisoner by the coup leaders, as Niger’s legitimate leader and had informed him of his decision.

More articles

Latest article

Africa’s largest economy is battling a currency crisis and soaring inflation

IBADAN, Nigeria - Feb. 19, 2024: Demonstrators are seen at a protest against the hike in price and hard living conditions in Ibadan on...

Turkey is back in from the cold with NATO and F-16 moves, but thorny issues remain

President of Turkey Recep Erdogan addresses journalists during the final national press conference during the high level NATO summit in Litexpo Conference Centre in...

Shares of supplier TSMC, chip equipment maker ASML fall ahead of Nvidia’s earnings report

A laptop keyboard, a binary code reflected and Nvidia logo displayed on a phone screen are seen in this illustration photo taken in Krakow,...

Skull and Bones, Singapore’s first major video game title, launches to mixed reviews

Justin Farren, Creative Director at Ubisoft Singapore, reveals "Skull & Bones" during the Ubisoft E3 conference at the Orpheum Theater on June 11, 2018...

Want steady, passive income? Buy these dividend stocks with higher yields, Wall Street says

Dividend stocks often appeal to investors who want steady income and long-term growth. And 2024 is shaping up to be a good year for...